Module 6 - Links provides outside references including the sources for many of the tools, checklists and documents contained elsewhere in the wikispace.



  • African Development Bank (AfDB)www.afdb.org. Various search tools in English and French, some tools directed towards project logical frameworks and for monitoring and evaluation efforts.

  • Alliance to Save Energy (ASE)www.ase.org. Promotes energy efficiency and offers experiences of companies in the household, commercial and industrial sectors. A few checklists are included that would help users prepare efficiency projects.

  • American Express – AMEX-Open - www.americanexpress.com “small business”. Has a small-business information source that provides basic concepts and advice. Much of the material has also found its way into the International Finance Corporation (IFC) SME Toolkit. It contains useful advice for the newcomer to proposal and business plan preparation, especially where the similarities between a business plan and a proposal are strong.

  • Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI)www.adb.org and www.adbi.org. ADB and ADBI offer a great deal of information (including the ADB operations manual) on line and it is easy to access many project document examples (in summary form). ADB provides a source of questions to be used in assessing conditions surrounding project implementation and ADBI provides information on experiences in various sectors (finance, microfinance, general environment).

  • Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre (APERC)www.apecsec.org.sg andwww.ieej.or.jp/aperc. Research and information resources for the Asia-Pacific region, especially at the macro level. Very detailed data and reports at this level. Some good country-level information and lessons learned. Under the more detailed themes (energy, SMEs, etc.) can be found data and also such items as an “Emergency Preparedness Checklist for SMEs”.

  • Australian Government overseas development assistance (AusAID)www.ausaid.gov.au/ausguide . AusAID provides information for preparing programmes and programme components. Its “AusGuide” is the framework into which its logical framework approach fits. It is a resource for covering most of the steps which a public-sector project must reflect. AusAID also maintains a “knowledge warehouse”, including lessons learned and good practices.

  • Basel Agency for Sustainable Energy (BASE)www.energy-base.org. BASE offers a few important things for Champions and Enablers alike. It provides a first-level inventory of sources of capital in the form of its sustainable energy finance directory. Users can search by technology and region and obtain short profiles of lenders, investors and others who might provide capital. BASE also introduces a facility (SEFI Transaction Support Facility) which is directed at building financial institution capacity and improving the likelihood of a match between the expectations of proposal "champions" and those of enabling financial institutions. BASE provides access to the UNEP environmental due diligence guidelines and useful links.

  • Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) -- http://cdm.unfccc.int/Projects. Provides information and ready access to CDM projects at their various stages. It also describes the CDM process and is a useful information resource for regular, small-scale (“simplified”) procedures and afforestation-reforestation activities. The project design document guidelines and templates are easy to access and use through http://cdm.unfccc.int/Reference/Documents.

  • CDM Gold Standardwww.cdmgoldstandard.org. A website sponsored by an NGO partnership, aimed at both quality improvement and ease of filing for CDM projects.

  • Cleantech Venture Networkwww.cleantech.com. Offers a variety of information on cleaner technologies and organizes venture fairs where truly venture-capital-quality commercial proposals can be presented to audiences of investors and participants (limited partners) in investment funds.

  • Community Development Carbon Fund (CDCF)http://carbonfinance.org. Offers a template for a project idea note (PIN) which has some utility for introducing the key features of a greenhouse-gas project. A separate document asks 10 community benefit questions of either a general or “who is involved” nature. Another separate document offers a quite useful financial template.

  • Consultative Group to Aid the Poor (CGAP), Microfinance Management Institute (MFMI), Microfinance Information Exchange, Microfinance Gateway and the United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) microfinance distance learning coursewww.cgap.org, www.themfmi.org, www.themix.org, www.microfinancegateway.org, www.uncdf.org. CGAP offers access to donor training materials and good practice reports including such items as due diligence guidelines (detailed text and charts) and case studies of organization evolution (Donor Good Practice No.18).

  • Department for International Development (DFID) (United Kingdom) – Operates a network of resource centres that include transport, water and communication nodes ([[http://www.transport-links.org and|www.transport-links.org]] www.iconnect-online.org). See Intermediate Technology Development Group

  • Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN)www.ecn.nl. Research and development resource for energy technologies, the built environment and policy. Offers snapshots of technologies and technical policy analyses. Useful for technology background quoting.

  • European Renewable Energy Council (EREC), European Wind Energy Association (EWEA), etc.www.erec-renewables.org,www.ewea.org. Mostly comprised of publications on policy and results and contains links and reference materials on best practices at the community, company, region and country level.

  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)www.fao.org. Includes the David Lubin Memorial Library online and a section on energy and technology which compiles specific subject papers.

  • Gapminderhttp://www.gapminder.org. Multidimensional and dynamic visualization of world development indicators. User-friendly interface lets anyone mine large data sets and intuitively interpret results.

  • German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)www.gtz.de. Programme for technical cooperation in specific thematic areas. The site describes programmes and themes.

  • Global Environment Facility (GEF)www.thegef.org. Site has a templates and guidelines section for preparing GEF full-size or medium-size proposals in biodiversity, persistent organic pollutants and climate change areas. “Fill in the blank” methodology. Also has links to the World Bank Development Marketplace (www.worldbank.org) where $34 million has been awarded to over 800 projects on a competition basis on a “proposal” and (invited) full proposal basis. Offers links to other organizations and grant programmes and introduces country-level competitions.

  • Integrated Southern Africa Business Advisory (INSABA)www.insaba.org. Templates and guidelines for preparing and evaluating renewable energy proposals are available here.

  • Interenvironment.orgwww.interenvironment.org. Published by the California Institute of Public Affairs (CIPA). Provides a directory of United Nations, international and national organizations involved in sustainable development. Offers an inventory of resources for information and links to other sites. Very organization- and environment-focused, with over 350 pages of information.

  • Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)www.ipcc.ch. Provides a wealth of highly technical data regarding climate change. Offers also a library of data slides to support proposals, if needed.

  • Intermediate Technology Development Group (ITGD) (recently renamed Practical Action)www.itdg.org. Offers numerous 5–10 page technical briefs on energy, water and sanitation, manufacturing and other sectors, with illustrations and cross references. Also has an extensive bookshop of publications and journals concerning small business and microfinance.

  • International Energy Agency (IEA)www.iea.org. A large source of information and forecasts concerning energy production and use. Useful source of developing country information through its World Energy Outlook reports. Library on the subjects of energy technology and technology cooperation. Good information source for energy proposals that need context.

  • International Finance Corporation (IFC) SME Toolkitwww.smetoolkit.org. Describes itself as free business management information and training for small business. This includes how-to articles, business forms, free business software to help entrepreneurs in emerging markets. See also American Express-Open.

  • International Monetary Fund (IMF)www.imf.org. A wealth of country-level information. Combined with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) World Factbook (www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/) and www.worldinformation.com , it is a quotable source which proposals can use in providing information at the country and region level.

  • Multilateral Investment Facility (MIF)www.iadb.org/mif/. Managed by the Inter-American Development Bank, MIF is a specialized fund that tends to invest in other funds. Offers a toolkit in English and Spanish for evaluating the potential of fund candidates, together with related forms and questionnaires.

  • National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (United States of America) – www.nrel.gov, www.nrel.gov/technologytransfer. A large archive of information with an emphasis on renewable energy research and development. Offers a number of sophisticated energy tools (including HOMER, Hybrid2 and RETFinance) and a regular set of updates on technologies (Power Technologies Energy Data Book).

  • Netherlands Development Finance Company (FMO)www.fmo.nl. Offers development through loans, guarantees, equity and quasi-equity in 40 countries worldwide. It works closely with local banks, international partners and Dutch partners and provides clear information on such topics as stimulating private sector growth. Included here as a good example of the kind of research a Champion should do before approaching an enabling organization.

  • Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)www.oecd.org. The site includes a section on managing for development results which includes a roster of country examples and a separate chapter on lessons learned (part 5) that are useful for planning programmes.

  • Overseas Private Investment Corporation, United States Small Business Administration, My Own Business, Inc.www.myownbusiness.org. Provides a series of tools aimed at assisting small business owners in getting started. Offers an online, 13-session course which includes sessions on accounting and cash flow, opening and marketing and business insurance. Mostly narrative, a few templates but good do’s and don’ts advice.

  • Practical Action. See Intermediate Technology Development Group.

  • RETScreen (CANMET, NASA, UNEP, GEF, Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP), Ministry of Natural Resources (Canada))www.retscreen.net – is a suite of tools for renewable energy technologies (solar photovoltaic, passive solar, solar hot air, solar hot water, bioheat, small hydro, wind) that include introductory (5–10 page) descriptions followed by 40–50 pages of technical terms, calculations and algorithms that transfer over to their spreadsheets, which provide performance, costing and financial analysis tools and greenhouse gas analysis. RETScreen also offers technically detailed analysis tools that allow first-level financial analysis. The output of the RETScreen-type analysis can then be used as input to further structuring of the kind that may customize a proposal to a private-sector enabler.

  • United States Agency for International Development (USAID)www.usaid.gov. Offers a library, including source of books and articles. Add MUCH MORE

  • United States Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energywww.eere.energy.gov. Offers a long list of technology-specific toolkits. These are mostly information resources, including information on companies, in niche markets. Useful for market research purposes. A lengthy list of more technical estimating and evaluation tools can be found, by subject, at other EEERE sites such as www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/tools_directory. Subjects where tools are inventoried include whole-building energy analysis, renewable energy and solar/climate analysis.

  • Wiley business publisherwww.wiley.com. Offers such detailed works as “Project Finance: Asset Backed Financial Engineering”, which offers introductions to matters such as cash flow before going into more technical matters.

  • World Bank Carbon Finance Unit. See Community Development Carbon Fund.

  • United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO)www.unido.org. Focuses on economy, environment and employment and devotes a section to investment and technology promotion. It offers business appraisal software (BEST), a financial improvement toolkit (FIT) and other tools. Also offers an enterprise development programme which describes the enterprise development and growth process.

  • UNCDF. See Consultative Group to Aid the Poor (CGAP).

  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)www.undp.org. Has a capacity development library and manages Development Gateway’s capacity development page (www.developmentgateway.org. Tools such as The Partnering Toolbook are available, and these include some evaluation templates and assessment materials.

  • United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)www.unep.org. Offers a large collection of information and links on a wide variety of clean technology issues, although renewable energy, energy efficiency and cleaner production are the most relevant subjects. It also offers tools such as a handbook for financial institutions which provides checklists (due diligence). Also has due diligence checklists for renewable energy technologies from the environmental perspective.

  • UNFCCC Secretariat Technology Transfer Clearing Househttp://ttclear.unfccc.int/ttclear/jsp/index.jsp. A compendium of information and reports on activities on technology transfer under the Framework Convention. The site has a huge collection of information ranging from project ideas, concepts and proposals extracted from technology needs assessments and other sources to the exchange of information through a pilot network, including information on projects and companies and links to other information sources.